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Rethinking TAs as Future Faculty

July 22, 2013 Teaching and Learning 1 Comment

Although this article addresses the student teaching model used in K12, I think this would make a for a rewarding template in Higher Ed.  Especially in situations where the TA aspires to become a faculty member after graduation.

Indiana University, Bloomington (Photo by Justin Kern)The article describes a more appealing approach than traditional student teaching – in which a teacher candidate starts out as a passive observer and then takes over the teaching after a few weeks-has become a part of the University of Southern Indiana’s teacher preparation process. That’s because classroom teachers are becoming increasingly reluctant to turn over their students to a novice for long stretches in an age when teacher pay and tenure are tied to student improvement and performance. “Teachers are beginning to be reluctant to host a student teacher,” said Joyce Rietman, director of USI’s advanced clinical experience and co-teaching. “Their name is on (the) test scores. It’s scary and risky to take a student teacher.” The article is from the Hechinger Report.

The full article can be found here: http://hechingerreport.org/content/indiana-universities-rethink-student-teaching_12564/

Currently there is "1 comment" on this Article:

  1. Fred Hagemeister says:

    Hosting student teachers is similar to master craftsmen mentoring journeymen yet without there being as return and absolutely less time for investment and results. But the result of less student teaching hosting seems to be heading towards co-teaching which has some advantages as stated in the article but can be more difficult than solely student teaching (extra effort for coordination and planning) which might make the experience worse for novice teachers.

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The CTLT liaisons are the bridge between teaching and technology. The liaison group collaborates primarily with University of Richmond faculty to effectively incorporate technology into the teaching and learning processes. We deal with diverse technologies, and are happy to work with any skill level.

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